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Is your word really "Law"?

Started by PPI Tracy, April 20, 2011, 04:20:21 PM

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PPI Tracy

There is the old saying, "Be careful what you wish for."  People also say, "if you name it, you claim it."  And, "don't put your word out there."

My question is this:  Do you think talking about paranormal activity within your home/environment if you have it there, in any way makes it increase or somehow opens the gates and or paves the way for it to start up?  Does talking about it "encourage" it and make it happen or is is just the power of suggestion that makes it seem like it starts up or makes it increase?

PPI Karl

Quote from: PPI Tracy on April 20, 2011, 04:20:21 PM
There is the old saying, "Be careful what you wish for."  People also say, "if you name it, you claim it."  And, "don't put your word out there."

My question is this:  Do you think talking about paranormal activity within your home/environment if you have it there, in any way makes it increase or somehow opens the gates and or paves the way for it to start up?  Does talking about it "encourage" it and make it happen or is is just the power of suggestion that makes it seem like it starts up or makes it increase?

You know how, sometimes, when you learn a new word, the next thing you know you're hearing it used by other people half a dozen times in the same week you learned it?  Is it a coincidence?  Is the universe suddenly rewarding you by letting you in on the conversation?  Nope.  Neither of these.  People have a bottomless capacity for glossing over the material of their existence--tuning into some things, and turning off to others--and what they're not noticing often has no bearing on how they define their reality.  And, if you introduce the idea of paranormal phenomenon into someone's repertoire of daily experience, there's a good chance they will make it manifest somehow--even if only in a subjective way. 

I do strongly feel that a belief in the paranormal activity of one's own home creates the phenomenon or magnifies the paranormal activity that's already there.  Belief becomes the filter by which one interprets every inconvenience or strange behavior that, because there wasn't any reason to pay attention before, one never noticed until now.  In these cases, it's difficult to separate paranormal activity from paranormal perception, and almost impossible to doing anything about it when paranormal perception turns into an attitude of persecution.  It's a feeling that feeds on itself and becomes a maddening obsession, like an itch that can't be scratched.  However, eventually people's paranormal perception levels out periodically--sometimes permanently, sometimes temporarily--because most people can't always pay attention to their itch all day long.  Those that do would be considered obsessive compulsive in some measure. 

I'm no psychologist, obviously, but I do have a hypothesis that obsessive compulsive tendency and perhaps even autism are factors in many of the personal claims of haunting, even if these are temporary conditions brought on by strong emotional trauma, such as grief.  (The historical claims of haunting are another matter.  Those are products of the social or cultural milieu.)

None of this necessarily invalidates the emotional complexity of feeling haunted, nor is it intended to discount the "reality" of some of the activity.  However, if the increase or decrease of paranormal activity we perceive at home is actually tied to our tendency to perceive it, then finding relief from it (if, indeed, it persecutes us) is a matter of conditioning and exposure therapy, and some of the recommendations we make, such as uttering protective chants, or speaking as a family to the "entity," are ways to face these fears and accustom (i.e., condition) people to the idea of sharing their daily lives with the paranormal.  And the success of that is wholly dependent on the commitment and personality of the individuals involved, as well as their influence on family members or other occupants. 
If you want to end your misery, start enjoying it, because there's nothing the universe begrudges more than our enjoyment.

PPI Tracy

Quote from: PPI Karl on April 21, 2011, 12:35:32 PM
Quote from: PPI Tracy on April 20, 2011, 04:20:21 PM

I'm no psychologist, obviously, but I do have a hypothesis that obsessive compulsive tendency and perhaps even autism are factors in many of the personal claims of haunting, even if these are temporary conditions brought on by strong emotional trauma, such as grief.  (The historical claims of haunting are another matter.  Those are products of the social or cultural milieu.)


You bring up interesting points, Karl.  Can you expand upon this particular hypothesis?

PPI Debra

Quote from: PPI Tracy on April 21, 2011, 12:48:14 PM
Quote from: PPI Karl on April 21, 2011, 12:35:32 PM
Quote from: PPI Tracy on April 20, 2011, 04:20:21 PM

I'm no psychologist, obviously, but I do have a hypothesis that obsessive compulsive tendency and perhaps even autism are factors in many of the personal claims of haunting, even if these are temporary conditions brought on by strong emotional trauma, such as grief.  (The historical claims of haunting are another matter.  Those are products of the social or cultural milieu.)


You bring up interesting points, Karl.  Can you expand upon this particular hypothesis?

I have the same question. It's interesting to me because I have people with both OCD and Autism in my life.

OCD is a form of ritualism, so I can understand the possible connection to the paranormal.

I have a theory that artistic types can create "paranormal activity" when they are not moving the creative energy in a positive way.

As for "the word", the New Age movement has done allot to reinforce the idea that humans have the same power as God ("In the beginning was The Word...)

I feel that we humans don't understand the power that what we say has on the psyche. The old shamans had a concept of "walking your talk" which was a sign of integrity.
"If you're after gettin' the honey, don't go killin' all the bees." -Joe Strummer

PPI Tracy

Quote from: Debra, PPI Consultant on April 21, 2011, 04:25:04 PM
Quote from: PPI Tracy on April 21, 2011, 12:48:14 PM
Quote from: PPI Karl on April 21, 2011, 12:35:32 PM
Quote from: PPI Tracy on April 20, 2011, 04:20:21 PM



I have a theory that artistic types can create "paranormal activity" when they are not moving the creative energy in a positive way.



Wow.  Knock me over with a feather!!!  That is a fascinating theory.  (sorry....still reeling over here.  WOW!  i know, i know....i already said that)

PPI Tracy


PPI Debra

"If you're after gettin' the honey, don't go killin' all the bees." -Joe Strummer

PPI Karl

I'll put some more of my thoughts together on this, this coming weekend. :)
If you want to end your misery, start enjoying it, because there's nothing the universe begrudges more than our enjoyment.