Author Topic: Is the Paranormal a Victim of Our Own "Quantum Belief"?  (Read 698 times)

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Offline PPI Brian

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Found this article during my daily paranormal rambles and thought it raised an interesting question. Thoughts anyone?

A post abbout the paranormal in relation to quantum science and the validity of EMFs in investigations: "More and more I see a great divide in the paranormal community between those willing to believe and those looking for a reason to believe...Does our search for answers and our reliance on specific research techniques actually affect the phenomena in such a way that the evidence is only there because of our belief in the methods we use to acquire it? In other words, do EMF detectors register spikes because we believe they should?"

http://www.theparafactor.com/blog/blog.php?id=7348720276257960149
"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence."--Carl Sagan

Offline PPI Tim

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The article does raise some good points. I think the article does reinforce what Karl said. The right approach to doing this hobby is to not to believe in ghosts and to not believe that there can't be ghosts. Keep an open mind and see what you discover. The search continues...
Sounds interesting...Go on.

Offline PPI Tracy

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No.  I don't believe so.  You can't make an EMF spike or high reading if it isn't there to begin with....just with the mind.  Incorporating external forces such as various electronics absolutely would.  Of course we all know this. 

If we are all being truthful here, we want to believe.  If we didn't believe, didn't want to, didn't think it was possible; would we even be spending our time, money and efforts in pursuit of something that we didn't think existed?  No. Of course not.  Most are doing this because they have either had paranormal experiences, had friends or loved ones who have, or are just intrigued and looking for our own answers.  That last "looking for our own answers" of course can be coupled with any of the previous reasons.  We all know EMF is real.  It's scientifically proven and exists in our environment.  The mind cannot create EMF.  We cannot "will" a detector to register spikes.  If we could, then these devices would be obsolete and of no use to professionals who utilize them and of course no use to paranormal investigators (professional or not   ;)  )

Anyway, do I think a person can conjure up an apparition with the power of their mind?  Of course.  Do I think that a person can conjure up an AVP/EVP?  Absolutely....in their mind.  The power of the mind is very amazing.....internally.  Externally, except in very rare circumstances, (and the jury is still out for me on that one) can someone actually have their mind effect the external.

Just my three cents.  Does this make sense? 
« Last Edit: March 10, 2010, 05:22:56 PM by TAPS Tracy »

Offline PPI Brian

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Yes, it makes perfect sense. Most if not all of us have had paranormal experiences that have profoundly affected us, and left us searching for answers. I think the difference lies in the way we search for those answers.

Like Karl and Tim, I think the "belief factor" can be a hinderance to paranormal investigation if we're not constantly aware of it's negative implications. Case in point -- a rerun of GH last night J & G picked up an EMF spike on a rusty antique tricycle with their K-II meter. They discussed it at length and regarded their readings as paranormal, and they even presented it as "evidence" of paranormal activity during the reveal to the client. We all know that certain metals can become naturally magnetized, and therefore radiate their own electromagnetic field. But their belief that the event was paranormal prevented them from considering other explanations for the EMF spikes.

So I agree with you; belief in ghosts in and of itself cannot create EMF spikes, but it can prevent an investigator from determining the source of the EMF spike. Responsible investigators don't try to "prove" the existence of paranormal activity. Their evidence speaks for itself. But people who have a vested interest in "proving" paranormal activity is occuring at a particular location may misinterpret non-paranormal environmental fluctuations as paranormal.
"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence."--Carl Sagan

Offline Damian

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Being a believer, I'm excitedly looking for evidence, and while it's thrilling and even romantic in a way to assume something unexplained is paranormal, I am frequently reminding myself that my job is to prove events to be of natural causes.  The irony of that is the more evidence I can prove to be of natural causes, the more impactful and persuasive any unexplained evidence will be.  It's a weird little mind game I play with myself to stay focused on finding natural causes and solutions.
"A mind all logic is like a knife all blade. It cuts the hand that wields it." --Rabindranath Tagore

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