Author Topic: Do Olfactory Hallucinations Support Multiverse Theory?  (Read 101 times)

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Offline PPI Brian

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Strong odors are often reported during paranormal encounters. "From the smell of rotten eggs that sometimes marks spirit activity to the overwhelming odors of the skunk ape", paranormal studies are often closely wrapped up in the odors described by experiencers. Now comes news of temporal lobe maladies that could lead to these olfactory experiences as well as visual experiences. Does this mean paranormal events are all in the mind? That question is addressed by Stacy Horn in her article on the publication of a new magazine from the Society for Scientific Exploration, although the example Horn uses has to do with auditory hallucinations and how previous beliefs people who "heard voices" were mentally disturbed were overturned, as mentioned in a post about A New Magazine: EdgeScience. http://www.stacyhorn.com/unbelievable/?p=1468
The first edition of this new magazine can be downloaded here for free:  http://www.scientificexploration.org/edgescience/

Here's a link to the article:

http://www.theparafactor.com/blog/blog.php?id=6648605057815823652
"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence."--Carl Sagan

Offline PPI Tracy

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Hearing
Sight
Touch
Taste
Smell
Emotions

This is the way we experience the world around us.  Naturally, some of these things would be the way spirits would communicate with us and we would perceive that communication through these.  To me, it's completely plausible to hear, see, feel and even smell paranormal occurrences.  I mean, how else would we? Most of us are not empaths or are psychic, although there are experiences when people think of a loved one who has passed and then have a paranormal occurrence right after that relates to the person they were thinking of.